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Towards the End of the Morning

€12.15
Set in the crossword and nature notes department of an obscure national newspaper during the declining years of Fleet Street, where John Dyson dreams wistfully of fame and the gentlemanly life - until one day his great chance of glory at last arrives.
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Michael Frayn's classic novel is set in the crossword and nature notes department of an obscure national newspaper during the declining years of Fleet Street, where John Dyson dreams wistfully of fame and the gentlemanly life - until one day his great chance of glory at last arrives. Michael Frayn is the celebrated author of fifteen plays including Noises Off, Copenhagen and Afterlife. His bestselling novels include Headlong, which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, Spies, which won the Whitbread Best Novel Award and Skios, which was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize. "Still ranks with Evelyn Waugh's Scoop as one of the funniest novels about journalists ever written." (Sunday Times). "A sublimely funny comedy about the ways newspapers try to put lives into words." (Spectator).

Products specifications
Publisher Faber & Faber
ISBN 9780571315871
Published 05/11/2015
Binding Paperback
Pages 240
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Description

Michael Frayn's classic novel is set in the crossword and nature notes department of an obscure national newspaper during the declining years of Fleet Street, where John Dyson dreams wistfully of fame and the gentlemanly life - until one day his great chance of glory at last arrives. Michael Frayn is the celebrated author of fifteen plays including Noises Off, Copenhagen and Afterlife. His bestselling novels include Headlong, which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, Spies, which won the Whitbread Best Novel Award and Skios, which was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize. "Still ranks with Evelyn Waugh's Scoop as one of the funniest novels about journalists ever written." (Sunday Times). "A sublimely funny comedy about the ways newspapers try to put lives into words." (Spectator).