You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search

The Roger Casement Memorial Statue

ISBN: 9781739713003
€10.00
This beautifully illustrated publication celebrates the installation of the Roger Casement statue, created by Mark Richards and commissioned by Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council as part of the Dún Laoghaire Baths’ restoration project.
Availability: Out of Stock
+ -
40 Points

In his fifty-one years of life, Roger Casement (1864-1916) undertook investigations into crimes against humanity that set new standards in field reporting and public advocacy. His revelations of extreme exploitation that
sustained the extractive rubber economies in the Congo and Amazon are now considered foundational to contemporary humanitarian
activism. Born in a house in Sandycove, Casement took his last steps in Ireland at Dún Laoghaire harbour. On Easter Saturday 1916, he was escorted in handcuffs onto a boat and taken to London to face a state trial for high treason. His
memory has never diminished in the affections of local citizens. Independent historian Angus Mitchell contextualizes the commemorative legacies
of Casement’s complicated life. Through a blend of images and words, he explores how the Casement memorial statue enables us to contemplate diverse intersections between history, memory, aesthetics, public space, and ethical remembering.

Write your own review Close Review Form
  • Only registered users can write reviews
*
*
Bad
Excellent
The Roger Casement Memorial Statue
This is a very informative and well written book with beautiful images and illustrations.
From: fergal | 12/05/2022 17:31
Was this review helpful? Yes No (0/0)
Description

In his fifty-one years of life, Roger Casement (1864-1916) undertook investigations into crimes against humanity that set new standards in field reporting and public advocacy. His revelations of extreme exploitation that
sustained the extractive rubber economies in the Congo and Amazon are now considered foundational to contemporary humanitarian
activism. Born in a house in Sandycove, Casement took his last steps in Ireland at Dún Laoghaire harbour. On Easter Saturday 1916, he was escorted in handcuffs onto a boat and taken to London to face a state trial for high treason. His
memory has never diminished in the affections of local citizens. Independent historian Angus Mitchell contextualizes the commemorative legacies
of Casement’s complicated life. Through a blend of images and words, he explores how the Casement memorial statue enables us to contemplate diverse intersections between history, memory, aesthetics, public space, and ethical remembering.