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The Act of Living: What the Great Psychologists Can Teach Us About Surviving Discontent in an Age of Anxiety

ISBN: 9781408711361
€17.99
€20.25
An highly original account of psychology through the discipline's great practitioners ( Freud, Jung etc) and their thoughts. It functions both as narrative and by extension a sophisticated self-help book. To be compared with Sarah Bakewell's How to Live and Alain de Botton's The Consolations of Philosophy
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Compared to previous generations, we have unprecedented access to information, increased personal freedom, more material comforts, more possessions, and longer life expectancy. Yet, a very significant number of people are dissatisfied. Levels of anxiety, stress and depression are rising at an alarming rate and in recent years prescriptions for drug treatments have doubled. As our material circumstances become easier, life seems to get harder. Why should this be? Shelves sag under the weight of self-help manuals and the internet is awash with the advice of role-models and celebrity gurus; however, to what extent can these sources be expected to supply meaningful, practical answers - the kind of answers relevant to sceptical individuals living in a modern, technologically advanced culture?

For over a hundred years, psychotherapists have been developing and refining models of the human mind. They have endeavoured to alleviate distress and they have offered help to people who want to make better life choices. Although the clinical provenance of psychotherapy is important, the legacy of psychotherapy has much wider relevance. It can offer original perspectives on the big questions usually entrusted to philosophers and representative of faith: Who am I? Why am I here? How should I live?

In this compelling and important book, the principle contributions of the outstanding figures associated with the practice of psychotherapy are explained: from Freud to Ellis, Jung to Laing, Adler to Hayes. Viewed as a single, cohesive intellectual tradition, Frank Tallis argues that psychotherapeutic thinking is an immensely valuable and under exploited resource.

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Compared to previous generations, we have unprecedented access to information, increased personal freedom, more material comforts, more possessions, and longer life expectancy. Yet, a very significant number of people are dissatisfied. Levels of anxiety, stress and depression are rising at an alarming rate and in recent years prescriptions for drug treatments have doubled. As our material circumstances become easier, life seems to get harder. Why should this be? Shelves sag under the weight of self-help manuals and the internet is awash with the advice of role-models and celebrity gurus; however, to what extent can these sources be expected to supply meaningful, practical answers - the kind of answers relevant to sceptical individuals living in a modern, technologically advanced culture?

For over a hundred years, psychotherapists have been developing and refining models of the human mind. They have endeavoured to alleviate distress and they have offered help to people who want to make better life choices. Although the clinical provenance of psychotherapy is important, the legacy of psychotherapy has much wider relevance. It can offer original perspectives on the big questions usually entrusted to philosophers and representative of faith: Who am I? Why am I here? How should I live?

In this compelling and important book, the principle contributions of the outstanding figures associated with the practice of psychotherapy are explained: from Freud to Ellis, Jung to Laing, Adler to Hayes. Viewed as a single, cohesive intellectual tradition, Frank Tallis argues that psychotherapeutic thinking is an immensely valuable and under exploited resource.

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