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Phoney Victory

ISBN: 9781788313292
€25.95
Peter Hitchens debunks the myths about Britain's role in `The Good War'
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Was World War II really the `Good War'? In the years since the
declaration of peace in 1945 many myths have sprung up around
the conflict in the victorious nations. In this book, Peter Hitchens
deconstructs the many fables which have become associated with
the narrative of the `Good War'. Whilst not criticising or doubting
the need for war against Nazi Germany at some stage, Hitchens
does query whether September 1939 was the right moment, or
the independence of Poland the right issue. He points out that in
the summer of 1939 Britain and France were wholly unprepared
for a major European war and that this quickly became apparent
in the conflict that ensued. He also rejects the retroactive claim
that Britain went to war in 1939 to save the Jewish population of
Europe. On the contrary, the beginning and intensification of war
made it easier for Germany to begin the policy of mass murder in
secret as well as closing most escape routes. In a provocative, but
deeply-researched book, Hitchens questions the most common
assumptions surrounding World War II, turning on its head the
myth of Britain's role in a `Good War'.

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Description

Was World War II really the `Good War'? In the years since the
declaration of peace in 1945 many myths have sprung up around
the conflict in the victorious nations. In this book, Peter Hitchens
deconstructs the many fables which have become associated with
the narrative of the `Good War'. Whilst not criticising or doubting
the need for war against Nazi Germany at some stage, Hitchens
does query whether September 1939 was the right moment, or
the independence of Poland the right issue. He points out that in
the summer of 1939 Britain and France were wholly unprepared
for a major European war and that this quickly became apparent
in the conflict that ensued. He also rejects the retroactive claim
that Britain went to war in 1939 to save the Jewish population of
Europe. On the contrary, the beginning and intensification of war
made it easier for Germany to begin the policy of mass murder in
secret as well as closing most escape routes. In a provocative, but
deeply-researched book, Hitchens questions the most common
assumptions surrounding World War II, turning on its head the
myth of Britain's role in a `Good War'.