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The Woman In Black
by Susan Hill

RRP €10.99

The Woman In Black
by Author Name Susan Hill

Book details for title
List Price:10.99
Format: Paperback, 198 x 129 x 14mm, 208pp
Publication date: 19 Jan 2012
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN-13: 9780099562979

Dubray Review

Arthur Kipps, a young solicitor, attends the funeral of his reclusive client, Mrs. Alice Drablow, and is intrigued by the presence of a pale gaunt woman in black lurking in the graveyard. Arthur is undeterred by the locals’ fear of either discussing Mrs. Drablow or their reluctance to visit her home, Eel Marsh House, and he settles in to the old isolated house in order to carry out his work. While there, the woman in black reappears and Arthur becomes unsettled, both by her presence and by what he learns of past events to do with the house. A sinister story concerning the previous occupants of Eel Marsh House begins to unfold, affecting Arthur in ways he could never have envisaged. This is a wonderful book, a truly gripping and spine-chilling ghost story that has the power to draw you in completely, right up to its most unexpected ending.

- Mairead Gallagher, Blackrock

Description

Arthur Kipps, a junior solicitor, is summoned to attend the funeral Mrs Alice Drablow, the sole inhabitant of Eel Marsh House, unaware of the tragic secrets which lie hidden behind the shuttered windows. The house stands at the end of a causeway, wreathed in fog and mystery, but it is not until he glimpses a wasted young woman, dressed all in black, at the funeral, that a creeping sense of unease begins to take hold, a feeling deepened by the reluctance of the locals to talk of the woman in black - and her terrible purpose.

Reviews

"Hill's haunting tales may be slim, but they pull no punches..." Harper's Bazaar "Heartstoppingly chilling" Daily Express "A rattling good yarn, the sort that chills the mind as well as the spine" Guardian "She writes with great power... Authentically chilling" Daily Telegraph "An excellent ghost story... magnificently eerie... compulsive reading" Evening Standard